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Environmental stability of coronaviruses

In collaboration with Prof Katie Laird (De Montfort University), we conducted studies investigating the survival and environmental stability of coronaviruses on various surfaces, particularly focusing on porous surfaces such as textiles.  

The stability of model human coronaviruses on textiles in the environment and during health care laundering.

During 2020/2021, there was limited research about the survival of coronaviruses on porous surfaces, and the risk of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 via fomites was not clear. Here, we investigated the persistence of seasonal common cold-causing human coronaviruses OC43 and 229E on various textiles.

We found that we could recover infectious OC43 from polyester after 72 hours (the maximum time tested), while on cotton, the virus was below the level of detection by 48 hours. 229E was less stable on all textiles. 

Survival of coronaviruses on textiles

We also evaluated transfer of OC43 from the textiles to either hard plastic surfaces or porous textiles. Transfer of infectious virus was detected on the recipient surfaces after contact with polyester that had been inoculated with OC43 up to 72 hours prior, suggesting that surface transmission of the virus could occur from contaminated polyester. No transfer was observed from cotton or polycotton donor surfaces. 

Finally, we investigated the efficacy of removal of OC43 from contaminated cotton textile by laundering. Cotton textiles are typically used in the healthcare sector

The published journal article is available here

Investigation of the stability and risks of fomite transmission of human coronavirus OC43 on leather.

In initial screens of various natural-product compounds, we identified mangiferin, a naturally occurring xanthone, to have anti-coronavirus activity. We found that mangiferin showed significant inhibition of infection by the common cold-causing human coronavirus OC43.

The effect of climbing chalk powder on the infectivity of human coronavirus OC43.

In initial screens of various natural-product compounds, we identified mangiferin, a naturally occurring xanthone, to have anti-coronavirus activity. We found that mangiferin showed significant inhibition of infection by the common cold-causing human coronavirus OC43.

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